Inflation is costing U.S. households nearly $300 more a month. Here’s how to adjust your budget – CNBC

A shopper bags fruit inside a supermarket in Chevy Chase, Maryland, on Feb. 7, 2022.

Mandel Ngan | Afp | Getty Images

Inflation is costing the average U.S. household an additional $296 per month, a Moody’s Analytics analysis found.

The figure is based on the latest reading on consumer prices, which rose 7.9% in February compared with a year ago, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

“It is going to get worse before it gets better,” said Moody’s Analytics senior economist Ryan Sweet, who conducted the analysis.

While the pain is felt across the board, some are feeling it worse than others.

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Low- and middle-income U.S. households spent approximately 7% more in 2021 for the same products they bought in 2020 or in 2019, an analysis by the Penn Wharton Budget Model found. In comparison, spending by wealthy households went up 6%.

A separate study by Wells Fargo showed the middle-class, in particular, is getting squeezed. Inflation was half a point higher for middle-income consumers than those at the highest and lowest end of the spectrum in December, Wells Fargo economists found. When broken down by race and ethnicity, Hispanics and Latinos had the steepest jump in living costs.

“The fear of inflation, the pandemic and war are challenging what future generations consider to be the American Dream,” said money expert Sahirenys Pierce, founder of personal finance blog Poised Finance Lifestyle.

Here are three ways you can try to combat inflation — and two things not to do.

1. Plan ahead

To save on gas, be strategic about the use of your car. If you have to run errands, do them in one trip and at a time when there is not a lot of traffic, suggests Misty Lynch, a certified financial planner with Walpole, Massachusetts-based Sound View Financial Advisors.

When grocery shopping, be armed with a meal plan for the week that’s already in place.

“It does help people save money if they know what they are going to eat and stick with it,” Lynch said.

Pierce likes apps such as Flipp to look up grocery store ads. She creates a meal plan for the week that incorporates items that are on sale and prepares three of those meals on Sunday. Having a plan in place for the remaining days of the week helps her avoid picking up takeout or fast food.

“This strategy has helped my family save hundreds of dollars during our debt-free journey, the pandemic and now during times of high inflation,” Pierce said.

2. Shop wisely

If you don’t need a specific brand item, you may save money at a discount grocery store. Buying items in bulk in a warehouse store, like Costco or BJ’s, may help you avoid future price hikes.

To comparison-shop, look at a product’s unit price, which is essentially the cost per unit of a particular product. For instance, canned goods may be priced per ounce and paper goods may be by sheet or feet. So while a product may seem cheaper at first, it may not be the best deal because it has fewer units than a higher-priced item.

Use coupons in-store and online. You may get them as part of a retailer’s reward program or credit card. Meanwhile, browser extensions like Rakuten and Honey automatically search for coupon codes and apply them at check out when shopping online.

3. Check your budget weekly

Since prices are increasing so frequently, it’s a good idea to review and reassess your budget on a weekly basis, Pierce said.

“You want to be aware of where all of your money is going and give yourself the opportunity to lower another area of your budget to make the numbers work,” she said.

One way to lower your costs is to cut out things you don’t need, like subscription services. You can also try negotiating to lower bills like your cable bill or car insurance, Lynch suggested.

Save on energy by unplugging appliances when they are not in use or using power strips with switches that allow you to completely turn off the products plugged into it. By doing so you could save 5% to 10% of your residential energy use, according to the Department of Energy. Turning down the heat can also help save money.

4. Watch out for credit card debt

It might be tempting to ride out the storm by accumulating credit card debt. Don’t do it, said Dawit Kebede, senior economist at the Credit Union National Association.

Credit card interest rates are already high, clocking in at an average just over 16%, according to CreditCards.com. They are expected to rise as the Federal Reserve hikes interest rates this year to help contain inflation.

5. Mind your retirement savings

Setting A Budget Is A Good Habit – Forbes

When and how should you set a budget?

getty

Creating a budget is always a good idea. But being accountable for your finances and spending habits may be daunting to some and natural to others.

Keeping in mind that not all budgets are equal, here are some guidelines to get you started. The goal is to understand why and how to budget according to your profile.

The Definition Of A Budget

A budget is a way one can keep account of their expenses. Having a budget helps us live within our means and avoid spending more than we make. 

Why You May Need To Create A Budget

It is wise to create a budget in various circumstances. Some of the top reasons to manage your finances are to:

1.     Stay out of debt

2.     Understand retirement finances

3.     Save for a significant expense

4.     Understand what you can afford

5.     Track where you spend money

Those Who Do Not Budget

There are two distinct categories for those who may need or not need to create a budget. While both groups may benefit from financial accountability, the two groups are those who are burying their head in the sand or those who are considered affluent.

Those uncomfortable getting real with their finances generally have similar concerns. They often have much debt, are embarrassed by their lack of savings, may have a spouse who overspends, or, as the adage goes, “ignorance is bliss.”

On the extreme opposite end are the super-wealthy individuals who don’t budget. This group earns enough to save and spend at their discretion, has enormous assets, or has an inheritance. Thus they are not concerned with their current finances.

Budgeting can be detail oriented or very broad.

getty

Where To Begin When Creating A Budget

Creating an effective budgeting strategy depends mainly on the individual. Some create spreadsheets and update them daily with what and where they spend, then reconcile these worksheets monthly to stay on track.

There are also budgeting software programs such as Quicken or proprietary ones created by financial advisors to attach credit cards and bank accounts. These services track and categorize your expenses, and although intuitive, they still require the human touch to assure accuracy.

Some people budget by setting up multiple bank accounts for designated monthly expenses such as personal, home, and savings. They pay into these accounts every pay period.

Then there is the automated budgeter. This person knows what they need to put aside for retirement and college savings and stays on track monthly and annually. From there, they spend the rest. 

Good Reasons To Make A Budget

The importance of budgeting varies according to many factors. While not everyone needs to budget equally, there are essential situations to consider.

1.     Unorganized Finances – If your financial record keeping is a mess, you need to create a budget. You need to understand what the inflows and outflows are that got you into this mess and start to keep track of where your funds are going. 

2.     Maintain Financial Goals – Create a realistic goal by living and subscribing to an initial budget. You can derive a true-to-life financial plan by learning what is affordable and what is not. 

3.     Planning For Retirement – Everyone needs to budget for retirement. Paychecks will inevitably stop, and you will need to rely on Social Security, investments, or a pension. The question is, how much do you need to retire? The answer is the amount required from your assets each year to live. And the only way to that answer is by budgeting. 

Budgeting In Wealth, Health, And Happiness

Financial planning is a series of questions based on who, what, when, and why, and it is wise to learn the art of accountability in all aspects of life. Learning our inflows and outflows is a healthy exercise. Budgeting might take work at first, but in the long run, it will secure you the financial stability needed to acquire wealth, and equally as important, peace of mind.

Please note, the information provided on this website is for informational purposes only and investors should determine for themselves whether a particular service or product is suitable for their investment needs. The content on this website is not intended to provide tax, legal, or accounting advice, and you are advised to seek out qualified professionals that provide advice on these issues for your individual circumstances. Financial planning and Investment advisory services offered through Diversified, LLC. Securities offered through Purshe Kaplan Sterling Investments, Member FINRA/SIPC Headquartered at 80 State Street, Albany, NY 12207. Purshe Kaplan Sterling Investments and Diversified, LLC are not affiliated companies. Diversified, LLC is an investment adviser registered with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Registration of an investment adviser does not imply any specific level of skill or training and does not constitute an endorsement of the firm by the SEC. Diversified only transacts business in states in which it is properly registered or is excluded or exempted from registration. A copy of Diversified’s current written disclosure brochure which discusses, among other things, the firm’s business practices, services and fees, is available through the SEC’s website at: www.adviserinfo.sec.gov. Diversified does not provide tax or legal advice and individuals should seek the advice of their own tax or legal advisors for specific information regarding their situations. Investments in securities involve risk, including the possible loss of principal. The information on this website is not a recommendation nor an offer to sell (or solicitation of an offer to buy) securities in the United States or in any other jurisdiction.

What’s for sale on the North Fork in East Marion – Northforker

Wondering what your budget can get you on the red-hot East End real estate market? We’re here to help, home buyers. In our biweekly column, we spotlight homes for sale in hamlets across the North Fork at various price points.

Located right next to Greenport and before Orient, East Marion is a lovely, peaceful community.

Sunset views and more

This home has three bedrooms, two bathrooms with close proximity to both Greenport and Orient. There’s a large deck with gorgeous sunset views, and room for a pool, all less than a mile from Rocky Point Beach. It’s listed for $885,000 by Bridget Elkin of Compass.

Nearly an acre of luxury

This mansion built in 2012 has four bedrooms, five bathrooms, a master bath with jacuzzi, wood floors throughout, massive backyard and in-ground saltwater pool. It’s listed at $1,759,999 by Nicole Commisso at Cross Country Realty.

New build, classic feel

This home was just built this year and has four bedrooms, 4.5 bathrooms, heated in-ground pool, large stone patio, media room and more. It’s listed for $1,595 by William Walters of Daniel Gale Sotheby’s International Realty.

5 signs you need a new laptop – Komando

You might to shocked to learn that the most reliable Chromebooks have an honest-to-goodness expiration date. Once that date is reached, it’s trash. The Chromebook will not get any more patches or updates.

Tap or click for a list of 17 Chromebook make and model numbers to avoid buying.

If you’re Googling, “Do I need a new laptop?” or “Should I upgrade or replace my laptop?” the answer is probably yes. Tap or click here for my picks for the best Chromebooks and Windows and Mac laptops for every budget.

Let’s look at the clear-cut signs buying a new laptop is in your immediate future.

Sign 1: Your laptop is a slow poke

I’m not just talking about web pages taking a little longer to load. I’m talking about when your laptop takes 10 minutes to turn on. Maybe you’re running two programs at once, and everything slows down to a crawl.

A laptop getting slower is mostly a sign of age. Of course, it could also mean you have malware or hackers on your device. Here’s how to tell if your computer has been compromised.

Laptops slow down as their memory fills up and when multiple applications are running at once. Sometimes you can speed up a computer by upgrading the CPU and RAM. You could save yourself a lot of money by upgrading your hardware.

My rule of thumb: When the cost to upgrade or fix an old laptop is 30% of the price of a new one, buy a new one.

RELATED: Want to keep your computer running smoothly for a long time? Tap or click here for 7 essential maintenance tips to keep your laptop happy.

Sign 2: It’s hot

Laptops come with built-in fans to keep cool. You may have heard the fan whirring when your machine has been running for a long time. It’s trying to make the toasty device drop a few degrees in your lap.

Over time, these fans can get full of dust and debris — or they’re just worn down. When this happens, your laptop will still heat up, but now it can’t cool itself down.

Ultimately, this kind of heating up signifies that you should replace your laptop. If your computer gets hot enough, it will cease to function. Consistent overheating can even lead to breakage or even melting.

Tap or click for 10 reasons your computer is running hot and how to fix them.

Sign 3: It’s a risk to use

Count your blessings if your laptop is more than four to five years old. One downside: Often, using an old machine is a considerable cybersecurity risk.

Software updates are critical for your digital health. Operating system updates come with new features that make life easier, but they also patch bugs that hackers exploit.

For example, you’re in danger if you’re still using Windows 7. Microsoft doesn’t update that OS anymore. Windows 10 or 11 get frequent updates, which means they have better cybersecurity protections.

Dig through your settings to see which OS you’re running. Research the latest update and see if your device can run it. If not, take this for what it is: One of the most prominent signs you need a new laptop.

Sign 4: Your screen or your keyboard is busted

Laptops are durable and made to take a beating. But even if you’re careful, accidents happen. Your screen might be missing a few pixels. It can also start flickering for no apparent reason.

Your laptop keyboard may be missing letters and numbers. Or perhaps certain keys no longer work at all. The trackpad may lose its sensitivity over time, too.

Rather than replacing a laptop screen, you can save some money and hook an external monitor up to it. You could also do the same with a keyboard.

Unless your laptop is less than three years old, repairing a screen or a keyboard is usually not the best decision. Sell it and apply that money towards purchasing a new laptop.

Have a parent or grandparent who needs a little help with their computer? Tap or click here for five tips to set up a PC for seniors.

Sign 5: Your battery doesn’t hold a charge

Laptop batteries, like phone batteries, lose charge as you use them. Over time, your laptop will eventually need to be charged more often.

This can escalate to the point where you must plug it in all the time to work. For many people, particularly those whose only computer is a laptop, keeping it powered up isn’t that much of a hardship. Laptops should be portable, though.

Not sure how your battery is faring? Tap or click here to check on your laptop’s battery health.

TRY MY NEW DAILY PODCAST FOR MORE TECH SMARTS

My popular podcast is called “Kim Komando Today.” It’s a solid 30 minutes of tech news, tips, and callers with tech questions like you from all over the country. Search for it wherever you get your podcasts. For your convenience, hit the link below for a recent episode.

If you can solve this riddle, you belong in the FBI. Well, maybe. Plus, holiday smart speaker tricks, Amazon now allows you to pay with Venmo, Chrome is going away with Windows 7 and browser extensions that take over your searches.

Get my podcast “Kim Komando Today” on Apple, Google Podcasts, Spotify, or your favorite podcast player.

Listen to the podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts. Just search for my last name, “Komando.”

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch The Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Florida couple paid off $190K in student loan debt in 27 months: ‘Get a budget’ – Fox News

Student loan debt is a hot topic right now among millions of Americans. 

The Biden administration recently announced it will wipe away the outstanding student debt for all those who attended schools operated by Corinthian Colleges, formerly one of the largest for-profit education companies. 

The administration also has floated the notion of forgiving other student debt. 

But people who have worked hard and played by the rules in order to live debt-free have their own thoughts about the idea of student loan forgiveness.

NJ COLLEGE GRADUATE PAYS OFF $70K IN STUDENT LOANS BY STARTING USED BOOK BUSINESS

Florida resident Sherman Merricks thought his student loan debt was a burden he’d never get rid of — yet he finally did. In an interview with Fox News Digital, he spoke about his debt total of $203,000, which was mainly from student loans. 

“I really had no financial plan to go to college,” he said. 

Sherman Merricks was carrying a total debt of over $200,000 — and nearly $190,000 of that was from student loans. (Merricks Family)

He said he assumed he’d “go to college and figure it out when I [got] there. They make it fairly easy for you to take out all those student loans at 18,” he added. 

Merricks graduated with an undergraduate degree in psychology from a private university before continuing his education and earning his master’s degree in biomedical science. 

Merricks, a small business owner, said he was paying $300 minimum each month on his loans and expected to continue paying that for the rest of his life. 

FLORIDA-BASED MOM PAYS OFF $40K IN STUDENT DEBT AFTER LIVING ‘PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK’

On top of the nearly $190,000 student loan debt, Merricks and his family added other debt by purchasing a vehicle, though they paid that off fairly quickly, they said. 

Cristina and Sherman Merricks of Gainesville, Florida, own two small businesses: a CrossFit gym and a sales marketing firm. (Noah Avery Photography)

Merricks and his wife, Cristina, have owned and operated a CrossFit gym in Gainesville, Fla., for about 10 years. 

To try to increase their income, they also opened a sales marketing firm just months before the COVID-19 pandemic hit in 2020. “We started the second business and it took off,” he said. 

The family came up with a tight, strict budget — saving everything they could. 

Merricks said that is what made him believe that one day he might be able to pay off his loans entirely. 

With a paused interest rate increase for student loans amid the coronavirus pandemic, Merricks said everything went toward paying down the debt. The family came up with a tight, strict budget, saving everything they could. 

OHIO WRITER PAID OFF $48K IN STUDENT LOANS IN 14 MONTHS: IT WAS ‘AN ADVENTURE’

The couple also took Dave Ramsey’s Financial Peace University course at the beginning of their marriage — which they credit for their new understanding of debt and how to get rid of it.

Cristina and Sherman Merricks paid off $203,000 in debt by doubling their income and doubling down on making payments. (Merricks Family)

Megan McConnell, senior director of public relations for Ramsey Solutions, said the course gives step-by-step guidance for how to pay off debt. 

It also teaches people how to save for emergencies and for the future while also building wealth. 

With every $1,000 the couple paid off, the kids filled in a space on an at-home chart.

“I am a checkbox, motivated type of person, so I could actually see the student loan balance going down,” said Merricks.

“I hadn’t seen the number go down in forever. That was a big motivator for me.”

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER 

The couple even got their three children — Kayden (14), Ariana (11) and Judah (8) — involved in the project.

With every $1,000 paid off, the kids filled in a space on their at-home chart. 

Merricks said this helped the kids understand why “no” was sometimes their parents’ answer when the kids asked for things; the process also showed the children how to set and achieve a goal. 

The family created a chart for the children to mark off each time a $1,000-payment was made. (Merricks Family)

In just 27 months, the couple said they paid off $203,000 in debt. 

They give credit to their faith — and believe they were extra blessed during this time. 

“I really do feel that was just the Lord’s blessing. He was just blessing our business,” said Cristina Merricks. 

The family of five lives in Gainesville, Fla.; Sherman and Cristina Merricks are shown with their children (from left to right): Kayden, Ariana and Judah. (Noah Avery Photography)

When asked if they would do anything differently, the couple responded with a firm “no.” 

For those who are in the same position as they were, the couple recommends making a strict budget and finding ways to increase family income.

Sherman Merricks believes if the government does choose to forgive student loans, then the taxpayers will be the ones paying for it. 

Regarding the conversations these days about the potential of wide student loan forgiveness from the Biden administration, Sherman Merricks believes that is simply talk. 

“The government will lose too much money, and we know the government’s not going to lose money,” he said. 

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Merricks believes that if the government does choose to forgive student loans, then American taxpayers will be the ones who wind up paying for it. 

Brittany Kasko is a lifestyle production assistant with Fox News Digital. 

Mind Your Money: Budget Breakdown For A Content Creator Making $200K – BET

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© 2022 Google LLC

BETNetworks – YouTube

Source: https://news.google.com/__i/rss/rd/articles/CBMiZWh0dHBzOi8vd3d3LmJldC5jb20vYXJ0aWNsZS9saG9rcnMvbWluZC15b3VyLW1vbmV5LWJ1ZGdldC1icmVha2Rvd24tZm9yLWEtY29udGVudC1jcmVhdG9yLW1ha2luZy0yMDBr0gEA?oc=5

Setting A Budget Is A Good Habit – Forbes

When and how should you set a budget?

getty

Creating a budget is always a good idea. But being accountable for your finances and spending habits may be daunting to some and natural to others.

Keeping in mind that not all budgets are equal, here are some guidelines to get you started. The goal is to understand why and how to budget according to your profile.

The Definition Of A Budget

A budget is a way one can keep account of their expenses. Having a budget helps us live within our means and avoid spending more than we make. 

Why You May Need To Create A Budget

It is wise to create a budget in various circumstances. Some of the top reasons to manage your finances are to:

1.     Stay out of debt

2.     Understand retirement finances

3.     Save for a significant expense

4.     Understand what you can afford

5.     Track where you spend money

Those Who Do Not Budget

There are two distinct categories for those who may need or not need to create a budget. While both groups may benefit from financial accountability, the two groups are those who are burying their head in the sand or those who are considered affluent.

Those uncomfortable getting real with their finances generally have similar concerns. They often have much debt, are embarrassed by their lack of savings, may have a spouse who overspends, or, as the adage goes, “ignorance is bliss.”

On the extreme opposite end are the super-wealthy individuals who don’t budget. This group earns enough to save and spend at their discretion, has enormous assets, or has an inheritance. Thus they are not concerned with their current finances.

Budgeting can be detail oriented or very broad.

getty

Where To Begin When Creating A Budget

Creating an effective budgeting strategy depends mainly on the individual. Some create spreadsheets and update them daily with what and where they spend, then reconcile these worksheets monthly to stay on track.

There are also budgeting software programs such as Quicken or proprietary ones created by financial advisors to attach credit cards and bank accounts. These services track and categorize your expenses, and although intuitive, they still require the human touch to assure accuracy.

Some people budget by setting up multiple bank accounts for designated monthly expenses such as personal, home, and savings. They pay into these accounts every pay period.

Then there is the automated budgeter. This person knows what they need to put aside for retirement and college savings and stays on track monthly and annually. From there, they spend the rest. 

Good Reasons To Make A Budget

The importance of budgeting varies according to many factors. While not everyone needs to budget equally, there are essential situations to consider.

1.     Unorganized Finances – If your financial record keeping is a mess, you need to create a budget. You need to understand what the inflows and outflows are that got you into this mess and start to keep track of where your funds are going. 

2.     Maintain Financial Goals – Create a realistic goal by living and subscribing to an initial budget. You can derive a true-to-life financial plan by learning what is affordable and what is not. 

3.     Planning For Retirement – Everyone needs to budget for retirement. Paychecks will inevitably stop, and you will need to rely on Social Security, investments, or a pension. The question is, how much do you need to retire? The answer is the amount required from your assets each year to live. And the only way to that answer is by budgeting. 

Budgeting In Wealth, Health, And Happiness

Financial planning is a series of questions based on who, what, when, and why, and it is wise to learn the art of accountability in all aspects of life. Learning our inflows and outflows is a healthy exercise. Budgeting might take work at first, but in the long run, it will secure you the financial stability needed to acquire wealth, and equally as important, peace of mind.

Please note, the information provided on this website is for informational purposes only and investors should determine for themselves whether a particular service or product is suitable for their investment needs. The content on this website is not intended to provide tax, legal, or accounting advice, and you are advised to seek out qualified professionals that provide advice on these issues for your individual circumstances. Financial planning and Investment advisory services offered through Diversified, LLC. Securities offered through Purshe Kaplan Sterling Investments, Member FINRA/SIPC Headquartered at 80 State Street, Albany, NY 12207. Purshe Kaplan Sterling Investments and Diversified, LLC are not affiliated companies. Diversified, LLC is an investment adviser registered with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Registration of an investment adviser does not imply any specific level of skill or training and does not constitute an endorsement of the firm by the SEC. Diversified only transacts business in states in which it is properly registered or is excluded or exempted from registration. A copy of Diversified’s current written disclosure brochure which discusses, among other things, the firm’s business practices, services and fees, is available through the SEC’s website at: www.adviserinfo.sec.gov. Diversified does not provide tax or legal advice and individuals should seek the advice of their own tax or legal advisors for specific information regarding their situations. Investments in securities involve risk, including the possible loss of principal. The information on this website is not a recommendation nor an offer to sell (or solicitation of an offer to buy) securities in the United States or in any other jurisdiction.

Couples’ Guide to Budget Planning – AARP

 

A well-conceived, well-tested household budget plan is the cornerstone of any sound financial strategy. Without this important tool, it’s difficult, if not impossible, to work toward a happy and secure retirement.

Now may be a good time to create that plan or revisit the one you have, especially with inflation at a 40-year high. Supply-chain issues and the war in Ukraine are also increasing the uncertainty about prices of goods and services.

If only you could convince your partner of the wisdom of making a budget. As hard as you try, the two of you just can’t seem to agree on how to allocate the resources you have between you.

“Most of my couples have a saver and a spender,” says Tess Zigo, a certified financial planner (CFP) at Emerge Wealth Strategies in Palm Harbor, Florida. “In my marriage, I’m the saver, focused on long-term priorities. For us it’s a good balance because my hubby reminds me to spend on things we enjoy today, because life is precious and limited.”

Often, however, agreeing on a budget is easier said than done, says Sergio Garcia, a CFP at BFS Advisory Group in Dallas, Texas. “Everyone has their own history and experiences with money,” he says. “We develop notions around how what it means and how to use it. This leads to different priorities and feelings, whether we realize it or not.”

Is all lost? Not if you can begin to “talk money with your honey,” says Bob Wolfe, a CFP at RegentAtlantic in Morristown, New Jersey. “When we find a misalignment with a couple’s spending priorities, we revisit what’s most important to them individually and reconcile those differences.” Then you can move toward creating a budget and an overall financial plan while safeguarding your relationship. These suggestions can help.

1. Talk, don’t assume or shut down

First, a reality check. Make sure that you know for certain what your partner thinks about money. Avoid assumptions, as that’s how misconceptions arise. Nor should either of you take the easy way out and shut down. In the Fidelity study, 24 percent of respondents said they are often frustrated with their partner’s money habits but let the problem go to keep the peace. 

Open, honest communication may not happen overnight; you may have to work toward it. While this process may be tricky, under the best circumstances, it can lead to a greater understanding and more compassion on both sides.

2. Admit when you need help, and find it

If you’ve been hitting a wall, then seek advice from a third party. A certified financial planner who’s willing to mediate and is adept at dealing with conflict can create the space for you to discuss your feelings, as well as draw out important information when one of you isn’t volunteering it. “This unbiased individual could be a therapist, coach or financial planner, depending on the circumstances,” says Marguerita Cheng, a CFP at Blue Ocean Global Wealth in Potomac, Maryland. The Financial Planning Association has a tool to help you find a planner in your area.

Ideally, you’ll begin to develop a unified vision so you can set joint goals. Partners who work with a financial adviser are more likely to find it easier to start money conversations, agree on a vision of retirement and feel confident about their financial health. You may want to look for a financial therapist. Members of the Financial Therapy Association are psychologists, marriage and family therapists, social workers, financial planners, accountants, counselors and coaches. 

Sense and Sensitivity | Friend blows her budget on nonessentials – Eureka Times-Standard

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Pricey Harriette: I am watching my good friend make poor monetary selections. Recently, she And that i sat down and broke down all of her month-to-month funds. We acquired here up with a month-to-month price range that factored in her lease, gasoline, groceries and everyfactor else she’ll want. After we broke it down, she was dissatisfied in what she would have left for discretionary spending. It’s been a month since we did this, And that i’ve already watched her spend what Ought to have been half of her month-to-month price range on nonimportant buying. Ought to I say one factor to her about this? — Poor Decisions

Pricey Poor Decisions: You’ve carried out your half by serving to your good friend see A clear path To creating smarter selections about money based mostly on what she has. Now It is her time To maintain to the plan you two designed.

Sure, You will Have The power to remind her and converse to her about her actuality. It Might be terribly disappointing to see how far your income Does not stretch To fulfill your wants or anticipateations In your life. Since your good friend has largely been dwelling with out regard to her means, It’d be surprising for her to even Take A whereas to curtail her spending Based on what she truly has.

It is going to take time for her To return to phrases Collectively with her assets and her life. You can cheerlead And in addition remind her that monetary freedom will come solely with self-discipline. Level out that if she doesn’t cease her reckless spending now, she Shall be broke earlier than the month is out. Resist the temptation to bail her out. If she has to face The outcomes of her overspending, it might assist her to take greater obligation for her actions.

Pricey Harriette: I’ve a good friend with whom I’ve a superficial relationship. We used to go To school together, however after commencement, we ceaseped Chatting with at least Every completely diffelease for months.

For my birthday final week, she submited An prolonged, intimate birthday trihowevere to me on her Instagram Website. She referred to as me her biggest good friend Inside the submit. This didn’t sit proper with me. We don’t converse enough for her To imagine about me her biggest good friend, And she or he is Aware of that. What could this be about? — We’re Not That Shut

Pricey We’re Not That Shut: Your understanding of closeness Might Even be completely diffelease from this particular person’s. Maybe You are nearer to her than she is with completely diffelease pals. Or, In case your instinct serves you, There’s one factor else at play.

Question: Is it important enough So as that you merely’re going to Have The power To evaluation? I ask Because you can simply let it go. She might really feel some Need …….

Source: https://www.times-standard.com/2022/04/17/sense-and-sensitivity-friend-blows-her-budget-on-nonessentials

Eating healthy on a budget – Hindustan Times

A budget diet that includes nutritious food is possible but geopolitical issues that are beyond our control have resulted in food prices rising around the world. Despite the fact that such situations have an effect on our food choices, eating properly is still crucial and living in a country like India, which is very rich in its diversity, every season provides us with some colorful food to cure and fulfill human body’s needs.

In an interview with HT Lifestyle, Susan Bowerman, MS, RD, CSSD, CSOWM, FAND, Senior Director of Worldwide Nutrition Education and Training at Herbalife, shared, “The first step in developing a healthy body is selecting the correct nutrition. The average energy consumption is 1200-1500 calories per day for someone aged 25-40. To maintain regular bodily functions, one should aim for about 120-150 grams of carbohydrates, 75-90 grams of protein, 50-60 grams of fat, and at least 5 daily servings of a variety of fruits, vegetables and greens.”

She explained, “The idea behind this is that even with a limited budget, you can still follow nutrition science and choose tasty and nutritious options. It’s easy to obtain many of the vitamins and minerals you need daily from local fruits and veggies at your local market, which are economical and easy to locate. Local seasonal veggies and fruits are the best choices if you want a healthy diet. Lean meat is a healthful choice when selecting animal proteins, but you may also opt for plant-based protein sources such as legumes and lentils. These plant-based proteins are also good sources of fibre, as well as essential minerals iron and zinc. Keep a record of the meals you eat and maintain a choice for each meal. It is also a way to prevent boredom.”

Asserting that no fancy things change your body on a permanent base, Madhavi Savani, Dietician and Lifestyle Counsellor at Apollo Hospitals in Ahmedabad, suggested, “Make sure that your meal plate contains as many colors as found in a rainbow. Learn to read food labels and find out the hidden, inevident unhealthy ingredients like artificial sweeteners, trans fats or cholesterol, caffeine, preservatives and most importantly expiry date. Not all expensive items that look healthy are a friend to your body. Nowadays, given our hectic and stressful lifestyle where it becomes difficult to even catch a breath, it is very important to look after your gut because it will definitely tell you what food items will hamper your digestive system.”